dynamicafrica:

Today, September 8th, is the 60th birthday of Ruby Nell Bridges - a woman who, being the first black child to attend an all-white school in New Orleans in 1960, underwent a traumatizing ordeal that came to signify the deeply troubled state of race relations in America.

On her first day of school at William Frantz Elementary School, during a 1997 NewsHour interview Bridges recalled that she was perplexed by the site that befell, thinking that it was some sort of Mardi Gras celebration:

"Driving up I could see the crowd, but living in New Orleans, I actually thought it was Mardi Gras. There was a large crowd of people outside of the school. They were throwing things and shouting, and that sort of goes on in New Orleans at Mardi Gras.”

Only six-years-old at the time, little Ruby had to deal with a slew of disgusting and violent harassment, beginning with threats of violence that prompted then President Eisenhower to dispatch U.S Marshals as her official escorts, to teachers refusing to teach her and a woman who put a black baby doll in a coffin and demonstrated outside the school in protest of Ruby’s presence there. This particular ordeal had a profound effect on young Ruby who said that it “scared me more than the nasty things people screamed at us.”

Only one teacher, Barbara Henry, would teach Ruby and did so for over a year with Ruby being the only pupil in her class.

The Bridges family suffered greatly for their brave decision. Her father lost his job, they were barred from shopping at their local grocery store, her grandparents, who were sharecroppers, were forcibly removed from their land, not to mention the psychological effect this entire ordeal had on her family. There were, however, members of their community - both black and white - who gathered behind the Bridges family in a show of support, including providing her father with a new job and taking turns to babysit Ruby.

Part of her experience was immortalized in a 1964 Norman Rockwell painting, pictured above, titled The Problem We All Live With. Her entire story was made into a TV movie released in 1998.

Despite the end of the segregation of schools in the United States, studies and reports show that the situation is worse now than it was in the 1960s.

Today, still living in New Orleans, Briges works as an activist, who has spoken at TEDx, and is now chair of the Ruby Bridges Foundation.

Shoutout to the girls with natural hair who’s edges don’t lay or curls aren’t defined. You’re beautiful!

(Source: gimmeyocookies)

An estimated 63 percent of young men between the ages of 11 and 20 who are imprisoned for homicide have killed their mothers’ batterers.

socialjusticekoolaid:

On the one-month anniversary of Michael Brown’s death, his family gathered at the Ferguson Police Department to again demand justice for his murder. Where is Darren Wilson, and why has he still not been arrested? #farfromover #staywoke

micdotcom:

One month later, Ferguson continues to feel the impact of Mike Brown’s murder

While the media coverage has died off significantly, local community members, activists and political figures continue fighting for police reform around one of the more galvanizing civil rights tragedies in recent memory.

Despite positive changes, the elephant in the room still hasn’t left |Follow micdotcom

i’m at a point in my life where everything is falling apart and everything is coming together at the same time.

arabellesicardi:

skinny people mad over nicki minaj’s lyrics, please multiply your feelings by 24/7 and then u will perhaps understand a little bit what thick girls may be going thru when your bodies are the ones that are served in stores, represented, desired and glorified……you can cope with 1 song not about u…………….we can do it together. i believe in u 

iwriteaboutfeminism:

Shaun King talks about the trauma of police brutality.

thepeoplesrecord:

Columbia student will carry her mattress until her rapist exits school
September 2, 2014

While most students at Columbia University will spend the first day of classes carrying backpacks and books, Emma Sulkowicz will start her semester on Tuesday with a far heavier burden. The senior plans on carrying an extra-long, twin-size mattress across the quad and through each New York City building – to every class, every day – until the man she says raped her moves off campus.

“I was raped in my own bed,” Sulkowicz told me the other day, as she was gearing up to head back to school in this, the year American colleges are finally, supposedly, ready to do something about sexual assault. “I could have taken my pillow, but I want people to see how it weighs down a person to be ignored by the school administration and harassed by police.”

Sulkowicz is one of three women who made complaints to Columbia against the same fellow senior, who was found “not responsible” in all three cases. She also filed a police report, but Sulkowicz was treated abysmally – by the cops, and by a Columbia disciplinary panel so uneducated about the scourge of campus violence that one panelist asked how it was possible to be anally raped without lubrication.

So Sulkowicz joined a federal complaint in April over Columbia’s mishandling of sexual misconduct cases, and she will will hoist that mattress on her shoulders as part savvy activism, part performance art. “The administration can end the piece, by expelling him,” she says, “or he can, by leaving campus.”

Read more

As painful as I know the constant reminder of attending school with her rapist must be, I’m glad she won’t be the only one forced to remember. I hope the rapist drops out immediately…or better yet, I hope he faces the justice he deserves. 

fuckyeahmarxismleninism:

Houston, Texas: March and rally in solidarity with the Ferguson uprising, August 20, 2014.

"Whose streets? Our streets! Took over the streets in Third Ward, marching in solidarity with Ferguson, from the HPD cop shop on West Grey and St. Emanuel and through the hood. We out-smarted the cops who were trying to block the streets and keep us on the sidewalks. HPD, out of our community!”

Report and photos by Gloria Rubac

atrapforfools:

next time you hear a white person say “well if black people can say the n-word why can’t i???” you should ask them “why do you want to?” and listen as they try not to say “black people have something of their own that I am not entitled to and that hurts my feelings and makes me feel inferior”